History

Last week, Years 7 and 8 students enjoyed an incursion from the Living History Company that took Year 7 students to the Ancient World of Rome and China and Year 8 students to the lively pageantry of Medieval History in Europe and Japan.

The Year 7 History students enjoyed interactive role-plays that took them through the complex social networking and politics of the Romans, as well as the life of a conscripted peasant in China. Students then got instruction on the various weapons and armour used by a multitude of ancient societies and also tried out some of the artefacts on display. The afternoon session involved Gladiator combat with padded armour and swords, some old-fashioned tug-of-war, and a bout of Celtic wrestling.

Year 8 students also enjoyed several interactive role-plays that immersed them fully into the world of a medieval knight training for service, as well as a female Samurai struggling to survive feudal Japan. Students then got instruction on the various weapons and armour used by a multitude of medieval and feudal societies and tried out some of the artefacts on display. The afternoon session involved an awesome archery tournament out on the oval. They also enjoyed a knightly tournament which involved melee combat between teams of four in the main arena.

 

Mr  Richard Munro

History Teacher

 

Please enjoy a reflection of the day:

“Last week, Year 7 History students were privileged  to experience the joys of Living History. The Living History team believe that history is best learnt through living the experiences of those who you are learning about and they were extremely helpful and knew how to make the day as interesting and fun as possible. They brought with them a range of different artefacts including: swords, maces, shields, tapestries, armour, helmets and much more. Some lucky volunteers were chosen to participate in a little bit of role play highlighting the daily life and struggles of those in Ancient Rome and Ancient China.

We liked how they kept the day interesting with fun games like Tug-of-war, but still managed to keep the learning aspect alive (Tug-of war originated in Egypt). They went into how slavery worked and how slaves were seen as property, not people. That linked in with the gladiatorial fighting we did (with foam swords and shields) and how the rule against hitting another’s head came about.

After an exciting day of Celtic wrestling, Ancient Olympic long-jump and a whole lot of fun, we are most definitely more aware of our past than what we previously were. We’re sure that this unique experience will stay with everyone for years to come.”

Gabrielle Milkins and Elyse Stephens,  Year 7